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In an Ongoing Commitment to Professionalism, International Court Reports will Provide Comprehensive Litigation Support Services in both Foreign and Domestic Settings, to All Public and Private Sectors of the Legal Community.

 

 

International Judicial Assistance for Court Reporters

Judicial proceedings vary widely from country to country. It is important to fully understand the country's judicial system and seek international legal assistance when preparing depositions in an unfamiliar country. Whether it is a UK deposition or a Canada deposition, if you are not familiar with the appropriate procedures it is crucial to find out what steps to take and seek international legal help.    

The United States of America's government has assembled information that can be helpful for those doing depositions abroad. American court reporters and court reporters from elsewhere in the world can take advantage of the following information and use it as a guide to successfully complete the legal proceeding in question. Below are links to information that may be of value to those traveling to foreign nations to complete depositions. It is advisable to always verify any information before taking actions in situations such as international court cases.



In the Middle East, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:
 
Learn more about Israel Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Iraq Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Iran Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Lebanon Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Saudi Arabia Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Turkey Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.



In Africa, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:

Learn more about Angola Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Egypt Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Libya Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about South Africa Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Sudan Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.



In Asia, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:

Learn more about Afghanistan Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about China Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Hong Kong Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about India Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Indonesia Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Japan Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about North Korea Court Reporter Judicial Assistance

Learn more about South Korea Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Pakistan Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Philippines Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Vietnam Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.




In Europe, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:

Learn more about Austria Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Denmark Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Finland Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about France Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Greece Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Hungary Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Iceland Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Ireland Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Monaco Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Norway Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Poland Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Portugal Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Russia Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Spain Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Sweden Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about United Kingdom Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.



North America, Central America, and the Caribbean Judicial Assistance Information:

Aruba Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Bahamas Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Canada Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Cayman Islands Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Costa Rica Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Honduras Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Mexico Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Panama Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.



In South America, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:

Learn more about Argentina Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Brazil Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Chile Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Colombia Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Paraguay Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Peru Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Venezuela Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.



In the Pacific Ocean region, Judicial Assistance information is essential in navigating what could be an unfamiliar culture:

Learn more about Australia Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Fiji Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

Learn more about Guam Court Reporter Judicial Assistance.

 

International Court Reporters Guide

Deposition Definition - Court Reporter Definitions

A deposition is evidence given under oath and recorded by a court reporter for use in court at a later date. International law depositions are given in courtrooms, but a US deposition is given outside a courtroom in certain well-defined circumstances. In the United States, it is a part of the discovery process in which litigants obtain information from each other in preparation for trial. Video depositions are common in the United States and in certain international locations.


Depositions


Attorneys for the non-deposing litigant are often present. The attorney who has ordered the deposition begins questioning the deponent by direct examination. Nods and gestures cannot be recorded by court reporters so the witness is instructed to answer all questions verbally. After the direct examination, other attorneys in attendance cross-examine the witness. The first attorney may ask more questions at the end, in re-direct, which may be followed by re-cross.


During the course of the deposition, an attorney may object to questions asked. In most jurisdictions, only two types of objections are allowed: to assert a privilege and to object to the form of the question asked. Objections to form are frequently used to signal the witness to be careful in answering the question. All other objections, in particular those involving the rules of evidence, are generally preserved until trial. They need not be made at the deposition.


The chief value of a deposition, as with any discovery proceeding, is to give all litigant parties in a contested case a fair preview of the evidence so that a level playing field is achieved and surprise is avoided at the time of trial. Another benefit of a deposition is to preserve a witness's recollection while it is still fresh, though the trial may still be some time later. In the event a witness is unavailable for trial, their deposition testimony may be read before the jury and made part of the record in the case, with the same legal force as live testimony. In some states, depositions can be offered into evidence even if the witness is available. In any case, one party can use a deposition to contradict the witness's testimony in open court.


Depositions
can be videotaped, so that the videotape may be played for judge and jury during the trial.

After a number of witnesses have been deposed, the parties will have enough information that they can reasonably predict the outcome of a prospective trial, and may decide to arrive at a compromise settlement, thus avoiding trial and preventing additional costs of litigation. Accordingly, while most depositions are not videotaped, it may be of value for parties to make a positive impression on the opposing side's lawyers with respect to affect and appearance because these are telling factors as to how that person will present in front of a jury.


Depositions in Criminal Procedure in the United States


The reasons for which a deposition may be taken vary among jurisdictions. Each state has its own laws which govern the taking of depositions.

Most jurisdictions provide that depositions may be taken to perpetuate the testimony of a witness, that is, preserve their testimony for trial. If the person requested to testify (deponent) is a party to the lawsuit or someone who works for an involved party, notice of time and place of the deposition can be given to the other side's attorney, but if the witness is an independent third party, a subpoena must be served. The deposition of the witness is taken and may be used to establish the witness's testimony in lieu of the witness actually testifying. In depositions to preserve testimony, the 6th Amendment's Confrontation Clause establishes the Constitutional right of the defendant be present during the deposition and to cross examine the witness. The defendant may waive this right.


Depositions for Discovery


Some jurisdictions provide that depositions may be taken for purposes of discovery. In these jurisdictions, the defendant does not have a constitutional right to be present, although such a right may be established by statute. A defendant in a criminal case may not be deposed without his consent because of the 5th amendment right to not give testimony against oneself.


International Depositions and Court Reporting or Videography

International Court Reporters, Inc. has teams of seasoned professional court reporters, legal videographers, translators and interpreters for your next deposition, EUO, meeting or video conference.


Phone: 877.643.3218 | Internationally: 440.826.4000 | Fax: 866.819.2317

 

 
 

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International Court Reporters, Inc. offers all professional litigation support services internationally. Clients include the United States government, doctors, insurance companies,and other legal professionals anywhere in the world. Certified court reporters, legal videographers, notaries, interpreters, translators, process servers, real time and live note court reporters, court reporters who specialize in case captioning, video conferencing, teleconferencing and deposition conference rooms all are available throughout the world, including Angola. See Call Court Reporters for the finest domestic services.